Minority Pre-Health Society makes debut

New club creates an environment for success in health professions

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Photo by Ayden Levine '23

This semester, Crystal Adams, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology, and her colleagues in the pre-health advisory committee came together to create the Minority Pre-Health Society (MPHS) in order to give support to racial and ethnic minority students at Muhlenberg in these fields of study. 

Adams, the faculty advisor of MPHS, hopes to give students who are underrepresented because of their racial or ethnic backgrounds access to resources that are necessary to succeed in health professions. The intention is to create an environment for pre-health students who are facing similar challenges. 

“I feel like there is a new community full of successful individuals.”

“We just want to bring together students so they have a safe space to talk about their concerns so that we can address them,” said Adams. 

The goal of this organization is to increase the success rate of minority students who attend medical school after their time at Muhlenberg. Adams hopes to lend a hand in this process “through various activities like bringing in health professionals, Muhlenberg alumni and getting access to resources that they need in order to get them through the program here at Muhlenberg.” 

“There are larger social structure problems that we can only go so far with at Muhlenberg, but there are a lot of things that we can do to help the underrepresented population,” Adams stated. 

Though MPHS is a fairly new organization, student members are eager for the opportunities this club will offer.

Sara Tabakha ‘22, a club member on the leadership board, explained, “I feel like there is a new community full of successful individuals.” 

Joseph Neeh ‘22 feels supported and motivated by MPHS. Even though he is a junior, he believes it will help with his future and the future of other Muhlenberg students as well.

“Yes, I can become a doctor even though I am a minority. Yes, I can become a doctor even though my parents are not educated.”

“Yes, I can become a doctor even though I am a minority. Yes, I can become a doctor even though my parents are not educated,” said Neeh. 

Tabakha shares similar thoughts with Neeh. She feels included in the MPHS environment and that she can be just as successful as other students. 

“I want to be a future role model for those who are like me,” said Tabakha. “They do not have to be white, rich or of a higher status to do so.” 

As leading members of MPHS, Neeh and Tabakha aspire to advocate for inclusion, success and support through this new organization. 


MPHS is working to spread the word about their mission throughout the Muhlenberg community. The club application is still in process. There is information on the pre- health website and their Instagram page for any interested students. Adams can also be reached via email, crystaladams@muhlenberg.edu, to address any further questions.

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