From the page to the stage

The Weekly goes live with Paige’s Page

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Paige Weisburg '22 hosting Paige's Page Live - Photo courtesy of Ayden Levine '23

On Nov. 10, Paige Weisburg, ‘22, author of The Weekly advice column “Paige’s Page” took to the Red Door to do a live version of her column. Students could come and ask questions at a microphone or write them down anonymously for Weisburg to answer.

“‘Paige’s Page’ was born last fall, when I wanted to get involved with The Weekly but I didn’t know what I wanted to do and joked with my friends about doing an advice column. I was also really adamant at the time that I didn’t want to use a pun for my name but here we are. After writing it for the past year, I joked about doing a live show and eventually talked to Cydney [Wilson, ‘23], who loved the idea and has been really supportive of this project since I mentioned it to her,” said Weisburg.

Weisburg has been writing Paige’s Page since the fall of 2021. She gives advice across various subjects, from social and relationship drama to trying new things. She’s stated on multiple occasions, including the very first edition of “Paige’s Page” and at the very beginning of the live show, that she may not be the most qualified to give advice on every subject she’s asked about, but she’s going to do it anyway, as she has opinions and she wants to share them.

“The room was so positive and everyone seemed so excited to be there and participate. It felt like I was just gossiping with my friends which is always fun.”

– Paige Weisburg ’22

“I honestly was very anxious. I didn’t actually think people were going to come. I had done a lot of advertising so I am happy that it paid off. I was worried people weren’t going to feel comfortable asking questions live, and I am so glad that people did because it was so fun being able to answer these questions directly to the people that ask them. Typically when I am writing Paige’s Page for the week, it’s just me on my couch thinking about the same question from the Google form for like 25 minutes and then writing up my response in the best way I can—three times. So I was excited about the idea of answering on the spot, and I think the advice I gave was actually pretty good!” reflected Weisburg about the experience.

Weisburg’s advice was a success, transitioning from the page to the stage with ease according to the audience reactions. People seemed to particularly enjoy it when she used her signature greeting of “Hey bestie!” for them. Those who asked live questions also often use the greeting at the beginning of their ask. The most popular types of questions were about fashion, as Weisburg is a known fashion icon at Muhlenberg, and food.

“​​Paige is the best gluten-free representation we could have on this campus! I had a great time and Paige created a really fun environment, but I especially loved the gluten-free restaurant answer,”  said Dina Maltser, ‘26.  

Weisburg also did a great job of creating a safe and comfortable environment for people to come forward and ask legitimate advice on things that have really been troubling them. While there was an anonymous question option, by the end of the event, questioners felt safe enough to ask serious questions. She quickly curated a relaxed dynamic with the audience.

“It was such a nice experience to come together. Because the questions that were asked are often things that we think we’re being dramatic about… or things that we think nobody else is going through. But then someone asks a question that you were also thinking about, maybe it was on a topic you thought you were overreacting about. So when it’s asked, there’s like this silent alliance formed. I think that’s really special. When I asked my question about feeling judged in the dining hall, I thought I was crazy before other people came up to me after and shared their experiences with that,” reflected Jem Berney, ‘26.

“​​Paige is the best gluten-free representation we could have on this campus! I had a great time and Paige created a really fun environment”

– Dina Maltser ’26

“The room was so positive and everyone seemed so excited to be there and participate. It felt like I was just gossiping with my friends which is always fun. It really allowed me to get out of my head. I feel like when I write Paige’s Page every week, I am thinking really hard about sounding smart and like I know what I’m doing, even though everyone that reads my column knows I don’t… I am not a performer by any means, but I felt really comfortable saying what I wanted to say behind a mic,” Weisburg explained, echoing the sentiments of the audience.

For Weisburg, who is graduating at the end of the semester, Paige’s Page Live was a great way to wrap up a long career with The Weekly. She, during the show and after, expressed sentiments of absolutely loving her time with the newspaper and said that it is one of the things that she will miss the most about Muhlenberg.

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